Silk Underwear and “Puddings” – February 1917

A party of us were discussing the difficulty of restricting our expenditure and so finding more for the War Loan when one said, “I don’t think it is people like us who can be expected to do much but there’s a great deal of wicked extravagance in dress among rich people.”

I expressed surprise at this, as I understood that society women had gone in for war work and given up “dress.” My friend went on to say that there never was a time when the underclothing of the rich was so costly. She was in the trade and she spoke of “a fantastic fashion for black silk underwear trimmed with white lace.

She told of a bride of a rich family who in her trousseau had three separate sets of underwear in crepe-de-chine, cream, pink and blue and had received gifts from her parents of gold-backed brushes, a mirror and trinket boxes for her dressing table.

Another of our company — a man — had a widely different story to tell. A woman in a small farm on the outskirts of a mining village told him that there was a miner who bought all her eggs weekly at three and four for a shilling for his dogs.

It seems that eggs are a favourite food for hounds that are kept for racing. He said he had been in the company of a number of miners one day when the scarcity of eggs was spoken of, and one of them remarked that a pudding had been made in his house the previous week, containing 32 eggs. The explanation of this extraordinary war pudding was that it was a mash for hounds previous to a “trail.”

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