Author Archives: dacj40

In a Train with Funeral Party – February 1924

I walked almost the whole length of a long train before I came to a third-class compartment that was not marked “Smoking.” There was a woman already seated in it, and she remarked as I sat down, “Although it isn’t … Continue reading

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Lady Astor’s White Gloves – February 1924

In reply to my query, “ Did you notice that the Labour women MPs prefer to sit hatless in the House?” a man asked me if I had seen in “to-day’s paper” that Lady Astor appeared with a clean pair … Continue reading

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Faults, But Not Grave – February 1924

With all its noble opportunities of love and service and practical guidance of the social evolution of the race, we must admit that in the home life of the domestic woman lie many dangers of narrowness of mind and of … Continue reading

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Suicide at 14 – February 1923

Most of us have been discussing the poignant tragedy of the suicide of a boy of 14 at a public school in the South of England where he was taken to task and kicked by two bigger boys because of … Continue reading

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Complacency of Cellar Living – February 1922

Only the other day I was talking with a woman — not yet very old —who remembers when there was a considerable population living in the cellars of the town in which she lived as a child. “They are all … Continue reading

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Birds on a Foggy Morning – January 1925

It is a foggy morning and still the smoke goes up largely from chimneys of factories and houses. The starlings wheel in small flocks over the chimneys towards the shoulder of a rounded hill which is the landward side of … Continue reading

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Potatoes a La Hotel Cecil – January 1925

There can be no question that in the labourer’s cottage and in the Scottish farm kitchen the potato is cooked, served and eaten with a relish unknown to the Hotel Cecil. A maid of ours drifted into a big London … Continue reading

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Old Age and Being a Burden – January 1925

Of late I have been pondering much on the word “home” and what it stands for in our thoughts and language. We have the Nursing Home, Home for Cripples, Home for the Incurable, Maternity Home, Home for the Blind, Home … Continue reading

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Christmas in a Hospital Ward – January 1925

Christmas decorations are a great feature in all hospitals at this season (those in England at any rate). Discussion and preparations begin weeks in advance and there is rivalry between the different wards as to which should achieve the most … Continue reading

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T. L. Peacock’s Views on Burns – January 1924

In a passage in T.L. Peacock’s Gryll Grange he exalts Robert Burns as the “faithful interpreter of nature.” No poet, he says is “truer to nature than Burns” and no one less so than Moore. Again, “Shakespeare never makes a … Continue reading

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